Fogg Emerging as Potential Candidate for Most Outstanding Rookie

As the Bombers’ defensive backfield crumbled from injuries, their one consistent defender in the secondary just happened to be a rookie. Kevin Fogg, a 1st-year player from Liberty University, has gotten better every week since winning a roster spot following constant interceptions in training camp.

Fogg’s four tackle, two interception and one fumble recovery game – with a 16.3 average on punt returns –  last week in Toronto was likely the best game any rookie has played this season. He was, however, burned for a touchdown on Diontae Spencer’s corner-route, and while he’s not always consistently a shutdown defensive back, it appeared as though Fogg thought the ball was already thrown given he had stopped running on the play. Playing the game’s most difficult position in the secondary, boundary halfback, while also proving to be a threat in the return game, Fogg is gaining the reputation of an exciting, highly-entertaining play-maker in his rookie year.

In a weak rookie class, Fogg could even be considered the leading candidate for the league’s Most Outstanding Rookie award, in fact. There’s very little competition as the season nears September; his biggest competition is perhaps Saskatchewan’s Ricky Collins Jr., who’s become an inconsistent performer given the struggles of the Riders’ offense. Loucheiz Purifoy is starting to come around in British Columbia, but at this point, there’s a lack of notable rookies at skill-positions.

When it comes to league awards, the voters don’t typically look very far past final statistics and other outliers, such as the success of the player’s team, injuries to other rookies, etc.. The level of difficulty of the player’s role/position in their system is not really considered – a defensive back could have five interceptions, but two of them, for example, came when he was in trap-coverage where he’s expected to make the play as the quarterback fell for the trick of the defense (see CJ Roberts’ pick-six against Hamilton) – or necessarily the amount of negative plays accumulated, or even his value to the team. There’s a difference between the ball being thrown to you, and making a play on the ball. Although it’s a different league and group of voters, Kansas City Chiefs’ cornerback Marcus Peters was crowned the AFC’s Defensive Rookie of the Year thanks to a whopping 7 interceptions, but he also allowed the fourth-most touchdowns and second-most yards in the entire league.

Fogg is accumulating those big, eye-popping numbers; he already has 3 interceptions, 42 tackles, a sack, a fumble-recovery and two return-touchdowns called back. It won’t be, but what should be considered is that he plays the defensive backfield’s toughest position in boundary halfback, which consists of being on a complete island in several coverages. The wide-side halfback has constant support from the strong-side linebacker – the short-side halfback does not.

Fogg has also dropped two easy interceptions – one against Montreal and one against Calgary – which would have boosted his stat-line even more, giving him three interceptions where the ball was thrown right at him and a total of five not even at the midway mark of the season.

Deservedly so, Fogg’s performance as a punt returner is causing a buzz around the CFL. He’s been electric back there, proving to be patient behind his blockers before bursting through the seem. It’s unknown if he’s sustainable as a punt returner since he’s more of an east-west runner, but the historic NCAA FCS returner is still young enough to be coached out of his bad habits. With blazing speed and cut-on-dime ability, Fogg has all the physical abilities required, but there’s no guarantee that head coach and special-teams coordinator Mike O’Shea won’t hand the return duties back to Quincy McDuffie when he returns from injury. McDuffie is quite capable, while in Fogg’s case, playing full-time on defense and special-teams is usually too much for a player to handle.

Regardless, if he keeps making big plays on defense, and the Bombers’ defense continues to improve, the accolades will come for Fogg. He could still be underappreciated for how well he plays away from the ball, but a Rookie of the Year award – the first Bomber to win since Chris Matthews in 2012 – would still be quite the feat for number 23.

NATHAN DENETTE (THE CANADIAN PRESS) I DO NOT OWN THIS PHOTO OR CLAIM TO.
NATHAN DENETTE (THE CANADIAN PRESS) I DO NOT OWN THIS PHOTO OR CLAIM TO.

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