CFL Draft 2017: Mason Woods (OG, Idaho) Scouting Report

At this point in preparation for the 2017 CFL draft, the crown as the number one offensive lineman in the class is still up for the taking. Idaho’s Mason Woods, though, may be the one to emerge atop everyone in the end.

Excluding Mississippi State OT Justin Senior, who’s NFL-bound, Manitoba’s Geoff Gray has been heralded as the top offensive lineman in the class. A participant in the East-West Shrine Game, Gray possesses otherworldly strength and ideal size. Woods, however, possesses some elite traits of his own and comes without as many technical flaws.

Woods was a three-year starter for the Vandals in the Sun-Belt conference. He played strong-side guard in Idaho’s pro-style offense, meaning on any given play he could be the left guard, right guard, or offensive tackle.

Measurables

Woods is a mountain of a man standing six-foot-nine. Despite his height, he’s able to bend his knees and out-leverage defensive linemen, similarly to Matt O’Donnell. Woods carries his weight healthily at 320 pounds.

Footwork, Agility

Woods is quite nimble for a man of his size. He consistently arrives on time in pass-protection, mirroring pass-rushers with ease. He does sometimes lack quickness to recover against hump-moves, or other sudden needed changes of direction. Despite being the puller on Idaho’s trap and counter runs, he’s not particularly fast getting out of his stance and into open space. He stands straight up on fold blocks, resulting in a fairly soft block on the edge defender. Woods’ footwork needs plenty of development. I’ve noted a plethora of over-sets and under-sets from the Port Coquitlam, B.C. native, while in the run game, Woods will often take work poor angles on fan blocks.

Hands

Woods’ hands are a strong-point for the 22-year-old. He’s the first to get his hands up upon the snap of the football, bringing them high and tight like a boxer, ready to punch at any given moment. He’s able to establish inside hand placement before his opponent. Woods’ arms are like a steel barricade for defensive linemen. If he’s able to reach an arm out, even just in desperation, Woods has a chance to stop the defender without drawing a flag. He possesses heavy hands to lock onto defenders and control their movements.

woods-active-hands
Woods’ fast, active hands in use.

Strength

Woods has remarkable bench-press-like strength. He’s able to use his upper-body strength to relocate defenders with force, whether they’re blitzers from depth or head-on defensive tackles. Woods is able to anchor against bull-rushes, as with his combination of lower-body strength and simply being a sheer mountain of a man, he’s tough to move backwards. He has the ability to stonewall inside rushes with strength, which is one way he compensates for his over-sets. Woods’ run-blocking is inconsistent at times, and it almost seems as though he’s wearing out throughout the game. At times, he’ll drive a defensive tackle off the ball, while other times he’s simply shield-blocking at the point of attack.

Woods (LG, 67) showing that bench press.
Woods (LG, 67) showing that bench press.
Now at RG, Woods shows off the bench-press-like strength again.
Now at RG, Woods shows off the bench-press-like strength again.

Pass Block Technique

Woods maintains solid pad level for a man of his size in pass-protection. He keeps a flat back throughout the block, but doesn’t always maintain a nice forward lean. He’s able to time his punch nicely. He gets his hands high and tight off the ball but, as mentioned, will over and under-set.

Run Block Technique

As mentioned, Woods works some poor angles as a run defender; he’ll sometimes step too flat on a fan block, allowing the defender to rip and come free, or sometimes too sharp, giving the defender the opportunity to run around his block. When blocking in the second level, Woods must become more consistent at rolling his hips underneath him to move the ‘backer, as well as breaking down in space. This goes hand in hand with Woods needing to keep his feet moving during blocks more often. Overall, Woods is a good run-blocker but lacks consistency.

The Skinny

Beyond both being 6’9″ and 6’10”, Woods reminds me Edmonton Eskimos RG Matt O’Donnell. Both players can bend their knees and use their size to their advantage. They have tackle size and quick enough feet – O’Donnell spent 2016 training camp as a right tackle with the Cincinnati Bengals – but will play their careers along the interior of the offensive line. Woods has elite strength and good technique, and his issues are all coachable. He comes without little red flags, and should be a highly sought-after prospect come draft day.

Grade: 4.45 (out of possible 6.5)
Projected round: One

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